Access 2010: Getting Started

Part 1 of 3 in the Access 2010 series. This course is designed with novice Access users in mind, but serves as a quick reference for more experienced Access users.
Course info
Rating
(69)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Nov 2, 2010
Duration
3h 48m
Table of contents
Getting Started with Access 2010 Training
Lab Setup
Introduction to Databases and Normalization
Overview of Microsoft Access 2010 Objects
Tour of Microsoft Access 2010
Understanding Object Views
Navigating Microsoft Access 2010 Database Objects
Creating Simple Forms
Form Formatting Basics
Description
Course info
Rating
(69)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Nov 2, 2010
Duration
3h 48m
Description

Part 1 of 3 in the Access 2010 series. If you are using a database that someone has already built and wish to modify or build your own queries, reports, PivotTables, PivotCharts, and calculated expressions, this course is a good starting point. This course is designed with novice Access users in mind, but serves as a quick reference for more experienced Access users.

About the author
About the author

Heather Ackmann is an accomplished instructor with a decade of teaching experience, helping students at the high school, college, and adult levels in a variety of topics. Specializing in Microsoft Office computer applications, she is a Microsoft Office Certified Master and holds a degree in English and Secondary Education.

More from the author
End-user Communications for Better IT
Beginner
2h 37m
17 May 2017
Word 2016 for Power Users
Beginner
2h 23m
21 Dec 2016
Microsoft Word (2016): Essentials
Beginner
1h 32m
4 May 2016
More courses by Heather Ackmann
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Getting Started with Access 2010 Training
Welcome to TrainSignal. I'm your instructor Heather Ackmann, and this is Access 2010 Training. This lesson is designed to acquaint you with the basic structure of the course. First, I'll begin by introducing the course and who the course is designed for. Then, I'll tell you a little bit about the person you'll be listening to, me, and then I'll give you a brief tour of the course content and supplemental materials included with the course.

Introduction to Databases and Normalization
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching Introduction to Databases and Normalization. This lesson is designed to give you a quick overview of databases and normalization so that when working in Access you'll have a better understanding of how your database was designed. Now with that, we'll start off with an introduction to databases, and discuss some of the differences between what's known as a flat-file database versus a relational database, as well as cover some problems encountered with some table structures. We'll also talk about a process called normalization, and, likewise, denormalization, and then wrap up the lesson by talking specifically about Access and normalization.

Overview of Microsoft Access 2010 Objects
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching the lesson Overview of Microsoft Access 2010 Objects. In this lesson, we're going to start off by giving you a general overview of what's known as database objects. Then we're going to dive into some basic specific objects in Access. There's tables, queries, forms, and reports. Then we're going to briefly touch on two other database objects, macros and modules, and then cover some basic terminology that you'll need before starting with Access 2010.

Tour of Microsoft Access 2010
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching Tour of Microsoft Access 2010. In this lesson, we'll be covering a variety of topics all related to navigating through Microsoft Access 2010, the application. We'll first start off by talking about how to start or launch Microsoft Access 2010. Then we'll move on to creating a new file, creating a new table, saving a database, opening a database, trusting a file, and we'll also cover some specific features inside the application itself, including the Quick Access Toolbar, the Backstage View, the Ribbon, and the Navigation Pane.

Understanding Object Views
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching the lesson titled Understanding Object Views. This lesson will begin by giving you a brief introduction to what exactly Microsoft Access Object Views are, and then we'll go through and cover the specific views associated with each kind of object starting with Table Views, then moving on to Query Views, Form Views, and last, Report Views. Introduction to Microsoft Access Object Views. No matter the object in Access, be it a table, query, form, or report, you have several ways of viewing each object in Microsoft Access 2010, but 2 specific views will more than likely be used the most, and that's Datasheet View and Design View. Every Access object will have what's known as Design View, and even though the Design View will look different depending on the object, the Design View is the grandmaster control area that will control how your object looks and functions. If you want to make changes to an object, the Design View is more than likely the view that you'll use. Datasheet View is specific to a few Access objects, most namely tables and queries. This is the view that you'd use to view data or the data results. It's also good for data entry. This view will have the same basic look no matter what kind of object you're in, which will look like a series of rows and columns, or, as we call them, fields and records. And there are other views that are specific to a particular kind of database object, and we'll discuss those views one by one depending on the specific object.

Navigating Microsoft Access 2010 Database Objects
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching Navigating Microsoft Access 2010 Database Objects. In this lesson, we're going to be giving you a tour of some navigation basics, as well as how to navigate specific Access objects, such as how to navigate a table or query, how to navigate a form, and how to navigate a report. Navigation Basics. In Microsoft Access 2010, no matter the object, Access allows you 2 ways to navigate through objects. One way is to navigate objects using your mouse, and the other way is by using specific keys and key combinations on your keyboard. But how you navigate will vary depending and your individual database, or at least how it was set up or programmed, and it'll depend on the kind of object you have open. So with that in mind, in order to discuss how to navigate, we're going to be tackling this according to the kinds of objects, starting with these top two objects, tables and queries, mainly because tables and queries have virtually identical ways to navigate through data. So let's get started.

Form Formatting Basics
You're watching Form Formatting Basics. In this lesson, we're going to talk about some formatting basics as they relate to form controls. Now if controls is a term that you haven't heard yet, we're going to start off with an introduction to what exactly a control is. After that, we'll jump into some basics with formatting those controls. We'll talk about resizing controls, moving controls, specifically how to add or delete a row or column, how to move a control within a layout, and how to split or merge cells. Then we'll dive in a little bit deeper with working with layouts and talk about how to create a stacked layout, a tabular layout, and how to remove a layout from a form. And finally, we'll wrap up the lesson by talking about how you can adjust the tab order and how to apply some basic themes.