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Connecting Microsoft Azure Virtual Networks

You need connectivity between Azure virtual networks (VPNs) and do not have the time, money, or patience necessary to deploy VPN gateways. This course teaches you how to plan, implement, and troubleshoot VNet peering in Microsoft Azure.
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Sep 14, 2018
Duration
1h 2m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Sep 14, 2018
Duration
1h 2m
Description

At the core of Microsoft Azure software-defined networking is a thorough knowledge of virtual networks (VNets) and their interconnectivity possibilities. In Connecting Microsoft Azure Virtual Networks, you’ll learn how to design, implement, and troubleshoot VNet peerings both within single regions as well as across different regions. First, you’ll learn how to choose between Vnet-to-VNet VPNs and VNet peering. Next, you’ll explore how to configure both types of VNet peering. Finally, you’ll discover how to troubleshoot VNet peerings when you receive unexpected results. When you’re finished with this course, you’ll have a foundational knowledge of VNet peering that will help you as you move forward in your career as a Microsoft Azure IT operations professional.

About the author
About the author

Timothy Warner is a Microsoft Most Valuable Professional (MVP) in Cloud and Datacenter Management who is based in Nashville, TN.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
(Music) Hi, everyone. My name is Tim Warner. Welcome to my course, Connecting Microsoft Azure Virtual Networks. I'm a Pluralsight staff author, Microsoft MVP, and Azure Solutions Architect. Software-defined networking usually presents a challenge, even to experienced Azure IT professionals. This course is a quick introduction to peering two or more Azure virtual networks for expanded network access. By the end of the course, you'll know when a VPN is a better fit for a solution than peering. You'll also know how to configure both intra-region VNet peering, as well as cross-region, potentially cross-subscription global VNet peering. You'll also be able to troubleshoot peering when you see unexpected results. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn VNet peering in our Connecting Microsoft Azure Virtual Networks course, at Pluralsight.

Configuring Virtual Network Peering
Hello there, and welcome to Pluralsight. My name is Tim Warner, and I'd like to welcome you to our course, Connecting Microsoft Azure Virtual Networks. This is the first module in two modules that comprise the course. Its title is Configuring Virtual Network Peering. We're going to begin this module by answering the question, why would you as an Azure Solutions Architect recommend that your customer have multiple virtual networks in their Azure subscription? We'll then plan for the virtual private network, or VPN, option when that's necessary, but as you can tell from the title of this module, our goal is to use another technology, namely peering. We're going to connect two Azure virtual networks, both where the two VNets are within the same region, that's called VNet peering, as well as when the VNets are in different Azure regions, this is called Global VNet peering. Let's get started. As we go through the course, and if you've taken other courses I've taught you already know this of course, the course includes an exercise files download that gives you both PDF representations of my slide decks and also a separate text file that contains hyperlinks to all resources that I reference over the course of each module. This is a site that you should definitely have bookmarked if you don't already. It's Microsoft's Azure Architecture Center. You can see that where I borrow an image or a website from Microsoft, I'll place a short URL link in the lower left corner of the slide. Those links are also contained in the exercise files that accompany this course. The Azure Architecture Center, as I said, is really the baseline beginning point for anybody who wants to do Azure solutions architecture. If for no other reason, you should check out the reference architectures to download Visio versions of those and use them as a starting point for your own Azure topology diagrams.

Troubleshooting VNet-to-VNet Connectivity
Hi there, and welcome to Pluralsight. My name is Tim Warner. This module is entitled Troubleshooting VNet-to-VNet Connectivity. Let's take a look at our learning objectives for this module. If you'll recall, in the previous module we discussed the VNet-to-VNet VPN as one way to connect two or more VNets together, but we focused the majority of our time on the peering relationship, and we did both VNet peering where the virtual networks exist in the same Azure region, as well as Global VNet peering where they're in different regions. Well, starting from that point now, let's verify connectivity to our VMs located on each VNet through that peering relationship. I had mentioned in the previous module that we'll need to take steps to foster name resolution, so we'll create a private Azure DNS zone for that. We'll then look at a number of tools to help you troubleshoot connectivity issues across VNet peering relationships. TCPing; I'll also throw in some PowerShell there. We'll look at Network Watcher, as well as Network Performance Monitor. These are all invaluable, because let's face it, software-defined networking, or SDN, in Azure can be complex if you're not coming into it already with a very solid grasp of how the TCP/IP protocol family works. So I'm hoping to deliver you some real value in this module. Let's get started.