Web Development: Executive Briefing

Web development has evolved rapidly in recent years. This course will give you an overview of the technologies used in modern web development as well as the skills required to assemble a first-class development team.
Course info
Rating
(27)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jul 31, 2018
Duration
30m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(27)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jul 31, 2018
Duration
30m
Description

Tech leaders need a fundamental understanding of the tools and technologies their teams use to build solutions. In this course, Web Development: Executive Briefing, you'll get an overview of all the technologies typically used to build modern web applications and the skills required on the teams that build them. First, you'll learn how to structure a web development team and make sure you have the skills required for development and deployment. Next, you'll discover the primary technologies used when building client-side browser applications. Finally, you'll explore the role of the server, server-side developers, and cloud services when building and hosting web applications. When you're finished with this course, you will have a foundational understanding of the technologies used in modern web development that will help you communicate better with your technical teams and understand the skills required on every web development project.

About the author
About the author

Brice has been a professional developer for over 20 years and loves to experiment with new tools and technologies. Web development and native iOS apps currently occupy most of his time.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Team Structure
In this module, I'll go over the skills required on a typical web development team and how they may or may not neatly map to any given group of developers. Let's start by talking about client-side developers. These are the people that write the code that will execute inside the user's web browser. The browser presents the user interface of an application, so good client-side developers often have user interface and user experience design skill. These are often abbreviated UI/UX, and people with those skills are often referred to as UI/UX developers. They use Hypertext Markup Language, HTML, to lay out the structure of a webpage and cascading stylesheets, CSS for short, to apply visual styling to those pages. I'll talk more about HTML and CSS later in the course. Client-side developers are also usually very familiar with the JavaScript programming language. JavaScript is a full-featured programming language that is supported by all of the major web browsers. The popularity and capability of JavaScript has exploded in recent years, which means that many modern web applications have as much or more client-side code as they do server-side code. That was not the case in the early days of web development. Client-side development has even grown to the point that it's not uncommon for there to be some specialization on larger teams. There may be developers that focus more on HTML, CSS, and the user experience, and others that focus more on writing JavaScript. However, you can't build a web application with a team full of client-side developers. You also need some server-side developers.

Client-side Development
In this module, I'm going to cover client-side development and the most popular technologies used to build applications that run in a web browser. I mentioned earlier that one of the reasons for the popularity of web development is that developers can code to the standards supported by web browsers and trust that their code will run on any computer in the world that has a browser. This is true, but the reality is not quite so idyllic. The reality is that all of the browser makers aim to support web standards, but they're very competitive and are always working to make their browsers faster and more user-friendly. The result is that there are occasionally small bits of code that work perfectly well in one browser and either generate an error or maybe just look a little different when rendered in another browser. The browser renders the user interface of a web application, so even slight differences in how a particular browser displays a button or positions a user input form can be very noticeable and distracting. The likelihood of running into one of these compatibility issues is not near as great as it was several years ago, but it's still something developers need to consider. Unless you know that you're developing an internal corporate application, and you know that all of your users will be using a particular browser, then part of web development really needs to be testing your application on multiple browsers so you can be sure all users will have the experience you expect.