Windows 8: Where'd It Go?

This Windows 8 course answers frequently asked questions from users like you: How do I set up Windows 8? Where is the Start Button? How do I switch between user accounts? Where do I go to turn on Windows Features such as Hyper-V? Where are my Admin Tools?
Course info
Rating
(98)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Mar 4, 2013
Duration
3h 3m
Table of contents
I Just Got a New Windows 8 Machine. How Do I Set It Up?
Where is the Start Button and Where Did My Desktop Go?
Where Do I Go to Login or Switch Between User Accounts?
Where Do I Go to Change My Sync Options?
Where Do I Change My Lock Screen, Account Picture, or Background?
Where Do I Go to Download, Install, or Update an App?
Where Do I Go to Download and Install Office 2013?
Where Do I Go to Search For Apps, Files, or Settings?
How Do I Add, Remove, Resize, or Group Tiles on My Start Screen?
Where Did the Shut Down and Restart Buttons Go?
Where is the Windows Explorer?
Where Do I Go to Import, Send, or Share Pictures?
Where are the Control Panel, System Image Tool and Admin Tools?
Where Do I Go to Turn On Windows Features Such as Hyper-V?
How Do I Refresh, Restore, or Reinstall Windows?
Description
Course info
Rating
(98)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Mar 4, 2013
Duration
3h 3m
Description

This Windows 8 course answers frequently asked questions from users like you: How do I set up Windows 8? Where is the Start Button? How do I switch between user accounts? Where do I go to turn on Windows Features such as Hyper-V? Where are my Admin Tools? Regardless of your level of technical expertise, when using a Windows 8 device for the first (or second or tenth time) you will have questions. This course will help answer some of those initial questions.

About the author
About the author

Heather Ackmann is an accomplished instructor with a decade of teaching experience, helping students at the high school, college, and adult levels in a variety of topics. Specializing in Microsoft Office computer applications, she is a Microsoft Office Certified Master and holds a degree in English and Secondary Education.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

I Just Got a New Windows 8 Machine. How Do I Set It Up?
Welcome to Train Signal. I'm Healther Ackman, and you're watching I Just Got a New Windows 8 Machine. How do I Set It Up? Whether you've purchased a new Windows 8 PC or tablet and have booted it up for the first time, or you are upgrading to Windows 8 on an older device, eventually you will be taken here, the Windows 8 installation guide, which is Microsoft's way of walking you through your initial device setup. So of course, the setup begins by asking you to read and accept the terms of the license, which of course I'm going to read right now. Da da da da da da. Okay, maybe not all of it. It's actually not that bad in terms of a license agreement, it's more readable than most, but I've read it, I'm going to check this little box down here saying that I accept the license terms and then click the Accept button. Next the installation guide will take you through four basic steps. The first one is a personalization step, where you can choose a color and a theme that you like and give this PC a unique name. And it can be any name you want. I usually like to make it specific to the device I'm using, so let's say I want to choose this pink or ew, that's really kind of Pepto-Bismol. Let's choose a lighter blue. That's better. And then I can give it a name, like Heather VM, since I am recording this Windows 8 course within a VM, I'm just going to call it that. And once you've chosen a color to personalize your Windows 8 experience and given it a name, you can go ahead and click next.

Where Do I Go to Login or Switch Between User Accounts?
Welcome to TrainSignal, this lesson is, Where Do I Go to Login or Switch Between User Accounts? To login from a desktop PC, you can either take your mouse and click anywhere on the screen, or press any key on your keyboard. And then, you'll be taken to the login screen, where you can type in your password, and then click the arrow, or press enter, to become logged in to your machine. Now the login process for a touch device, like a tablet computer, is very very similar. You'll be met with a very similar login screen, with the date and time on it. And all you've got to do is take your finger and swipe up to view your personal login screen where you can enter your password. To log off from any kind of Windows 8 device, what you can do, in the upper right-hand corner from your Start screen, click right on your name or your avatar, and you'll see a couple of options, there's change account picture, lock, and sign out. If you'd like to sign out, you can simply click on sign out, or choose sign out, and you'll be taken back to that familiar wallpaper, with the date and time.

Where Do I Go to Change My Sync Options?
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching the lesson titled, Where Do I Go to Change My Sync Options? Before I show you where to go to change your sync options, I thought I might spend some time on the pros and cons of sync, a brand new feature which is only available if you sign in using a Windows account. So, if you are using a Microsoft account to sign in, you can choose to sync certain preferences across multiples devices, such as a tablet, a Windows phone, or even a desktop PC, but there are times when you might not want certain features to sync between devices. For example, though I might want my settings to sync between my personal devices, such as my home PC and my tablet, I might not want my desktop background on, say, my work PC. Now some solve this by having multiple Microsoft accounts, one for personal use and one for professional use, but you don't really have to. Microsoft has designed a way so you don't have to juggle between having multiple Microsoft accounts or logins. Instead, you can just turn off or change what syncs between your devices.

Where Do I Change My Lock Screen, Account Picture, or Background?
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson titled, Where Do I Go to Change My Lock Screen, My Account Picture, or My Desktop Background? If you are wanting to personalize your Windows 8 device, such as customize the look of the lock screen, the start screen colors or design, your account picture, or even something like your desktop background, chances are those settings will be in one of two locations, in your PC settings under Personalize, or in your Control Panel's appearance and personalization section under Personalization. And I will be showing you how to navigate to both locations in this lesson.

Where Do I Go to Download and Install Office 2013?
You're watching Where Do I Go to Download and Install Office 2013? At the time of this recording, Office 2013 is currently in what we refer to as the customer preview stage. That means that the Office Suite is not quite ready to be sold. Microsoft is still testing and looking for bugs. But customers can download the Suite, try it out, and submit feedback to Microsoft up until the final release. So until they're finished this is where you go to download the Microsoft Office customer preview, www. microsoft. com/office/preview. Just keep in mind that to download the Office preview, you will need a Microsoft account.

Where Do I Go to Search For Apps, Files, or Settings?
You're watching the lesson titled Where Do I Go to Search for Apps, Files, or Settings? Personally speaking, searching in Windows 8 is easier than it's ever been, but it takes some getting used to. When you are looking at your Start screen and wondering where something is, there is really only one thing that you need to remember when searching in Windows 8, and that is, to just start typing. Typing right from the Start screen will automatically open up the Search charm and begin searching your device. As you type, results will start to appear, and will narrow as you complete your words. If you do not have a keyboard and you are using a touch-enabled device, you can access the search charm by swiping in from the right and tapping on the search icon or charm, and that's how to search for things in its most basic form.

How Do I Add, Remove, Resize, or Group Tiles on My Start Screen?
Hi, you're watching the lesson titled How Do I Add, Remove, Resize, or Group Tiles on My Start Screen? That's right, this lesson is everything you could ever possibly want to know about organizing tiles on your Start screen. Many times after installing an app, you might notice that Windows 8 will automatically add a tile to your Start screen, regardless of whether or not you actually want a shortcut tile on your Start screen. For example, I have an app here called Periodic Table and I think the app is awesome. It's so pretty, look at that. Click on an element and there's all of its information, but I'm not a scientist, I'm not going to be using this app on a daily basis, so having a tile for this app on my Start screen really isn't necessary. To remove any tile, you can right-click on that tile, or if you are using a touch-enabled device, just flick the tile up or down and that will open up the Tile Options bar at the bottom of your Start screen. Now, what options you see on this bar will vary depending on the app, but what you will always see are two options and that is to Unpin that tile from Start or Uninstall. Uninstall will uninstall the app from your machine, so if you're just wanting to remove the tile from the Start screen, but you want to keep the app, that is not the option to choose. What you want is Unpin From Start. Clicking that will remove the tile, but if we search for that app, you can kind of see, there it is, Periodic Table, it's still installed on my device. And that is how you remove a tile from your Start screen.

How Do I Refresh, Restore, or Reinstall Windows?
You're watching how do I refresh, restore, or reinstall Windows. You have three basic options for fixing Windows should it start acting funny. You can now do what Microsoft calls refreshing your PC. A refresh doesn't touch your files or personal settings and won't remove apps that were installed through the Windows store. However, PC settings will revert back to their defaults and apps installed from discs or websites will be removed. You also still have the option to restore which hasn't changed much from previous versions of Windows. Now restoring Windows back to an earlier time also keeps files and personal data intact but any recently installed programs or drivers might be uninstalled. The last option is to reinstall Windows altogether. This is like doing a factory reset, where all files, datas, apps, programs, settings will disappear and Windows will do a fresh install of itself without the need to reformat or install Windows 8 using a disc or USB drive. Now in this lesson, I will show you all three.